Topic Tag: Accessibility

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    • ToolKit: Managing Digitization Projects Intro Session: Ann Stegina ToolKit: Module 3: Managing Digitization Projects Intro Session: Get inspired- Resource/Links Meet the presenter: Ann Stegina Anchorage Art Museum Link: Presented by Ann Stegina https://www.anchoragemuseum.org/ Online Platforms: Anchorage Museum Collection database: http://onlinecollections.anchoragemuseum.org/#/ http://onlinecollections.anchoragemuseum.org/#/categories - The AAM uses TMS (which is a collections management software similar to PastPerfect used for collections metadata) Library and Archives: - Anchorage Museum Library: Link: https://jlc-web.uaa.alaska.edu/client/en_US/ancmuseum/ - Alaska’s Digital Archives: (archives with historical photographs, albums, oral histories, documents, physical objects and other museum and libraries throughout the state) Link: https://vilda.alaska.edu - Anchorage Museum Archive Image Search: Photo archive collection includes more than 700k photographs and print materials on Alaska and the Circumpolar North. (uses TMS) Link: http://ec2-34-219-202-254.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com:3000 Pandemic Photography Project: Using TMS, The Anchorage Art Museum used budget friendly resources to digitize Museum objects. - Ann suggests using white paper or poster board for backdrop when capturing a photograph of the object. - She also used ‘foamcore’ for the reflective light. South Dakota Art Museum Link: https://www.sdstate.edu/south-dakota-art-museum Meet the presenters: - Taylor Mckeown, Coordinator of Collections, South Dakota Art Museum: Taylor.Mckeown@sdstate.edu - Carolyn Hart. Coordinator of Marketing & Membership Development, South Dakota Art Museum: Carolyne.Hart@sdstate.edu Social Media: SDartmuseum (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn) Digitization Pre-Pandemic: - SD Art Museum uses ‘PastPerfect’ for Collections Database - ‘PastPerfect’ Is museum software that combines collection and contact management into one software package. PastPerfect Link: https://museumsoftware.com PastPerfect Pricing Link: https://museumsoftware.com/pricing.html Past Perfect Video Tech Tips & Webinars Link:https://museumsoftware.com/videos.html Discussed: is FADGI (Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative) Link:http://www.digitizationguidelines.gov/guidelines/FADGI_Still_Image_Tech_Guidelines_2016.pdf - SD Art Museum created a 30-day art challenge, which encouraged social media participants to share participate by submitting on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. They incorporated the use of hashtag #sdartchallenge, and tagging (@sdartmuseum and Brookings Arts Council @brookingsartscouncil) - New website content from existing collections materials: - As an example, day12 from the 30-day art challenge people can submit a family photo. By doing so the museum can share on social media from their own collections of an example of a family photo as well as incorporating history of the photo. - By sharing the 30-day arst challenge, the museum was encouraged to create more content for their own website and social media post. - The museum was also able to create more content for their E-Newsletter. - Daily social post and hashtag them using #SDARTCHALLENGE & #MUSEUMFROMHOME people were able to participate from all over the world. - Created informative content for their visitors. SD Art Museum Instagram Link: https://www.instagram.com/sdartmuseum/?hl=en SD Art Museum for their reopening created an exhibit named “50 Works for 50 Years Collections Retrospective” Link: https://www.sdstate.edu/south-dakota-art-museum/exhibit/50-works-50-years-collections-retrospective - Beginning from 1970-2010 the ‘50 works’ was shared online. - The museum was able to translate the exhibit digitally during the Pandemic. - The visitor can select which decade they would like to explore and be brought to a page. - The museum created ‘object cards’ that visitors can click and would open up an artwork with information for each of the 50 works, such as artist bio, and more information. Example: Oscar Howe homepage Link: https://www.sdstate.edu/south-dakota-art-museum/2016-50-works-50-years - Each page gives a bio of the artist and related archival images. - Celebrate the museums history. - The museum was able to get copyright permissions - Used ‘recycled’ biography from previos exhibit - Link back to collections pages - Archival images - The project relied on what they already had and made the information more accessible. Plenty of Dividends: - Good bridge to making the collection accessible online - Helped make connections with artists and donors - Accessibility fulfilled our mission Marketing and Development: - Stayed connected with our core constituents: visitors & donors - Broadened the outreach to new constituents - Learned to maximize our website, despite its limitations. No Additional Resources used: - The museum’s share drive with Collections images - SDSU’s online archive of historical photos - Box for sharing files - Word documents for content - Excel for a simple schedule - Drupal (SDSU’s website web platform) - All from our home offices Best photo scanning apps: - SnapSeed Link: (is a photo-editing app for IOS and Android that enables users to enhance photos and apply digital filters) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.niksoftware.snapseed&hl=en_US&gl=US - Google Photos scan (free): Link: https://www.google.com/photos/scan/ - Adobe Bridge for editing (free): https://www.adobe.com/products/bridge.html - More information on various APPs: https://www.techbrackets.com/best-photo-scanner-apps Meet the presenter: Ann Stegina Anchorage Art Museum Link: Presented by Ann Stegina https://www.anchoragemuseum.org/ Online Platforms: Anchorage Museum Collection database: http://onlinecollections.anchoragemuseum.org/#/ http://onlinecollections.anchoragemuseum.org/#/categories - The AAM uses TMS (which is a collections management software similar to PastPerfect used for collections metadata) Library and Archives: - Anchorage Museum Library: Link: https://jlc-web.uaa.alaska.edu/client/en_US/ancmuseum/ - Alaska’s Digital Archives: (archives with historical photographs, albums, oral histories, documents, physical objects and other museum and libraries throughout the state) Link: https://vilda.alaska.edu - Anchorage Museum Archive Image Search: Photo archive collection includes more than 700k photographs and print materials on Alaska and the Circumpolar North. (uses TMS) Link: http://ec2-34-219-202-254.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com:3000 Pandemic Photography Project: Using TMS, The Anchorage Art Museum used budget friendly resources to digitize Museum objects. - Ann suggests using white paper or poster board for backdrop when capturing a photograph of the object. - She also used ‘foamcore’ for the reflective light. South Dakota Art Museum Link: https://www.sdstate.edu/south-dakota-art-museum Meet the presenters: - Taylor Mckeown, Coordinator of Collections, South Dakota Art Museum: Taylor.Mckeown@sdstate.edu - Carolyn Hart. Coordinator of Marketing & Membership Development, South Dakota Art Museum: Carolyne.Hart@sdstate.edu Social Media: SDartmuseum (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn) Digitization Pre-Pandemic: - SD Art Museum uses ‘PastPerfect’ for Collections Database - ‘PastPerfect’ Is museum software that combines collection and contact management into one software package. PastPerfect Link: https://museumsoftware.com PastPerfect Pricing Link: https://museumsoftware.com/pricing.html Past Perfect Video Tech Tips & Webinars Link:https://museumsoftware.com/videos.html Discussed: is FADGI (Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative) Link:http://www.digitizationguidelines.gov/guidelines/FADGI_Still_Image_Tech_Guidelines_2016.pdf - SD Art Museum created a 30-day art challenge, which encouraged social media participants to share participate by submitting on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. They incorporated the use of hashtag #sdartchallenge, and tagging (@sdartmuseum and Brookings Arts Council @brookingsartscouncil) - New website content from existing collections materials: - As an example, day12 from the 30-day art challenge people can submit a family photo. By doing so the museum can share on social media from their own collections of an example of a family photo as well as incorporating history of the photo. - By sharing the 30-day arst challenge, the museum was encouraged to create more content for their own website and social media post. - The museum was also able to create more content for their E-Newsletter. - Daily social post and hashtag them using #SDARTCHALLENGE & #MUSEUMFROMHOME people were able to participate from all over the world. - Created informative content for their visitors. SD Art Museum Instagram Link: https://www.instagram.com/sdartmuseum/?hl=en SD Art Museum for their reopening created an exhibit named “50 Works for 50 Years Collections Retrospective” Link: https://www.sdstate.edu/south-dakota-art-museum/exhibit/50-works-50-years-collections-retrospective - Beginning from 1970-2010 the ‘50 works’ was shared online. - The museum was able to translate the exhibit digitally during the Pandemic. - The visitor can select which decade they would like to explore and be brought to a page. - The museum created ‘object cards’ that visitors can click and would open up an artwork with information for each of the 50 works, such as artist bio, and more information. Example: Oscar Howe homepage Link: https://www.sdstate.edu/south-dakota-art-museum/2016-50-works-50-years - Each page gives a bio of the artist and related archival images. - Celebrate the museums history. - The museum was able to get copyright permissions - Used ‘recycled’ biography from previos exhibit - Link back to collections pages - Archival images - The project relied on what they already had and made the information more accessible. Plenty of Dividends: - Good bridge to making the collection accessible online - Helped make connections with artists and donors - Accessibility fulfilled our mission Marketing and Development: - Stayed connected with our core constituents: visitors & donors - Broadened the outreach to new constituents - Learned to maximize our website, despite its limitations. No Additional Resources used: - The museum’s share drive with Collections images - SDSU’s online archive of historical photos - Box for sharing files - Word documents for content - Excel for a simple schedule - Drupal (SDSU’s website web platform) - All from our home offices Best photo scanning apps: - SnapSeed Link: (is a photo-editing app for IOS and Android that enables users to enhance photos and apply digital filters) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.niksoftware.snapseed&hl=en_US&gl=US - Google Photos scan (free): Link: https://www.google.com/photos/scan/ - Adobe Bridge for editing (free): https://www.adobe.com/products/bridge.html - More information on various APPs: https://www.techbrackets.com/best-photo-scanner-apps

      Started by: melissa_sainz (Fellow) in: Managing Digitization Projects

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    • 1
    • 4 months ago

      melissa_sainz (Fellow)

    • Accessibility Overlays in websites: Pros and Cons What are accessibility overlays? - Accessibility overlays is a plug-in tool ‘that detects accessibility issues directly on a webpage and tries to ‘repair’ them in real-time, instead of inside of the web code. “Typically, you’ll get a snippet of JavaScript code to plug into your website, which will then try to automatically fix accessibility issues in the background as the page loads.” - Accessibility overlays are marketed to ‘instantly make all necessary repairs on your website and help your Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) problems disappear.’ Why are they bad? - They don’t properly solve for accessibility. And to improve digital accessibility is to actually do the work required. - The plug-in tool has inadequacies by applying automatic fixes to the issues detected, theirs also risks in breaking the website’s user interface. - Overlays don’t address your Mobile properties. - Overlays also inhabit no control over the speed or security of the website, which could result in being hacked. What is the best solution? - ‘To achieve WCAG is to do the work, complete an automated and manual audit of your site and address all accessibility issues you uncover at their core. Can also mean updating your content and code.’ For more resources: https://www.essentialaccessibility.com/blog/the-many-pitfalls-of-accessibility-overlays https://www.essentialaccessibility.com/blog/wcag-22-aa-summary-and-checklist-for-website-owners " rel="noopener" target="_blank">https://www.accessibility.works/blog/avoid-accessibility-overlay-tools-toolbar-plugins/

      Started by: melissa_sainz (Fellow) in: Digital Accessibility and Inclusion

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    • 1
    • 6 months ago

      melissa_sainz (Fellow)

    • Tactile interactives and accessibility Question: We have tactile interactives in some of our new exhibits; is there a recommended way to sort of alert people with limited or no vision that they are there? (For now, unfortunately, they have been uninstalled due to COVID but they will hopefully be back eventually). Answer: Think about implementing inclusive design throughout your museum as it will not only benefit visitors with limited or no vision or other disabilities but will benefit all visitors to the museum. For example, audio guides have been implemented at places such as the Andy Warhol Museum through audio recordings made available via a mobile app that utilizes location recognition software to alert visitors to various aspects of the museum and tactile exhibits as they navigate the museum and individual exhibits. In this particular example, guided tactile descriptions and tactile reproduction have been found to be most helpful for visitors who are blind or have low vision but enhance gallery experience for all visitors. Furthermore, be proactive and make sure that your institution has a website with updated information that is easy to find and clear for those who have questions about accessibility. This will present another opportunity to let all potential visitors know what interactives are available in the museum and how accessible they are. Source: Inclusive Digital Interactives: Best Practices and Research. Smithsonian Press, 2020. https://access.si.edu/sites/default/files/inclusive-digital-interactives-best-practices-research.pdf This is a wonderful resource of case studies that highlight best practices in inclusive design which highlights digital interactives. Other helpful sources: Roberto Vaz, Paula Odete Fernandes, Ana Cecília Rocha Veiga. Designing an Interactive Exhibitor for Assisting Blind and Visually Impaired Visitors in Tactile Exploration of Original Museum Pieces. Procedia Computer Science, Volume 138, 2018, Pages 561-570, ISSN 1877-0509, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.procs.2018.10.076. See also “Revisiting Touch in Pandemic Year Two” blog post & linked paper by Cheryl Fogle-Hatch (who was cited in at least one of the webinars in this module, I believe) https://museumsenses.org/revisiting-touch-in-pandemic-year-two/

      Started by: Trevor Woods in: Digital Accessibility and Inclusion

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    • 1
    • 6 months ago

      Trevor Woods

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